christmasonthemoon:

Peter Jackson to Make 13 ‘The Hobbit’ Movies

“Help us,” pleaded Ian McKellan, one of the stars of what’s sure to be the decade’s biggest film franchise. “He won’t let us leave.”

by Peter Jackson on Monday, July 30, 2012 at 8:30am ·
It is only at the end of a shoot that you finally get the chance to sit down and have a look at the film you have made. Recently Fran, Phil and I did just this when we watched for the first time an early cut of the first movie - and a large chunk of the second. We were really pleased with the way the story was coming together, in particular, the strength of the characters and the cast who have brought them to life. All of which gave rise to a simple question: do we take this chance to tell more of the tale? And the answer from our perspective as the filmmakers, and as fans, was an unreserved ‘yes.’

We know how much of the story of Bilbo Baggins, the Wizard Gandalf, the Dwarves of Erebor, the rise of the Necromancer, and the Battle of Dol Guldur will remain untold if we do not take this chance. The richness of the story of The Hobbit, as well as some of the related material in the appendices of The Lord of the Rings, allows us to tell the full story of the adventures of Bilbo Baggins and the part he played in the sometimes dangerous, but at all times exciting, history of Middle-earth.

So, without further ado and on behalf of New Line Cinema, Warner Bros. Pictures, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Wingnut Films, and the entire cast and crew of “The Hobbit” films, I’d like to announce that two films will become three.

It has been an unexpected journey indeed, and in the words of Professor Tolkien himself, “a tale that grew in the telling.”

Cheers,

Peter J
The movie is not the book. They’re different mediums. It’s not been possible in the movie to emphasize language and poetry, for example, as Tolkien did. Nor do we get the attention to detail regarding various characters’ backgrounds and interrelationships. It’s not possible unless it’s three 12-hour movies, I suppose. And, you know, as authors, Tolkien and Peter Jackson have different sensibilities. While Peter obviously cares a great deal for Tolkien’s writing—otherwise he wouldn’t have given so much of his life to it—what seems to have drawn him most as a filmmaker was the pure adventure aspect of the tale. The heroic sacrifice of individuals for the common good. All the breathtaking sequences—he really poured himself into those. The more I explored Tolkien, the more I felt I had two bosses: Tolkien and Peter Jackson. I tried my best to be loyal to both of them.
Easily one of the greatest films of all time, in my opinion. Not only in terms of its social and political overtones, but as well as just pure dramatic realism. Even though its premise was fantastic this film still came off to me as so realistic, which made it more disturbing and saddening. At its core, despite its premise being so “out there,” it was a very human story and contained issues important to everyone and who we are as people, what it means to be human, and how we treat others. Very thought-provoking and just an exciting as well as unique movie.

Easily one of the greatest films of all time, in my opinion. Not only in terms of its social and political overtones, but as well as just pure dramatic realism. Even though its premise was fantastic this film still came off to me as so realistic, which made it more disturbing and saddening. At its core, despite its premise being so “out there,” it was a very human story and contained issues important to everyone and who we are as people, what it means to be human, and how we treat others. Very thought-provoking and just an exciting as well as unique movie.